SAT

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SAT

Overview

SAT_prep_Banner

The SAT is a globally recognized college admission test that lets you show colleges what you know and how well you can apply that knowledge. It tests your knowledge of reading, writing and math — subjects that are taught every day in high school classrooms. Most students take the SAT during their junior or senior year of high school, and almost all colleges and universities use the SAT to make admission decisions.

Taking the SAT is the first step in finding the right college for you — the place where you can further develop your skills and pursue your passions. But SAT scores are just one of many factors that colleges consider when making their admission decisions. High school grades are also very important. In fact, the combination of high school grades and SAT scores is the best predictor of your academic success in college.

The SAT doesn’t test logic or abstract reasoning. It tests the skills you’re learning in school: reading, writing and math. Your knowledge and skills in these subjects are important for success in college and throughout your life.

  • The critical reading section includes reading passages and sentence completions.
  • The writing section includes a short essay and multiple-choice questions on identifying errors and improving grammar and usage.
  • The mathematics section includes questions on arithmetic operations, algebra, geometry, statistics and probability.

Test Formats

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Skills Time Limit Questions & Sections Score
Reading 70 minutesOne 20 minutes section

Two 25 minutes section

19 Sentence Completion48 Passage-based reading 200-800
Math 70 minutesOne 20 minutes section

Two 25 minutes section

44 Multiple choice10 Grid- in 200-800
Writing 60 minutesOne 10 minutes section

Two 25 minutes sections

25 Improving Sentences18 Identifying sentence errors

6 Improving Paragraphs

1 Essay

200-800
Experimental 25 minutes Math, Reading or Grammar Section Not – Scored
Total 3 hours 45 minutes 10 Sections 600 – 2400

The Critical Reasoning section of the SAT measures a person’s ability to understand and analyze written material. The questions carry a .25-point penalty for incorrect answers. The Critical Reading Section consists of two types of questions.

The Critical Reading Section

  • Reading Comprehension (including both long and short passages)
  • Sentence Completion

The format of the three sections is:

  • 25 minutes: 8 Sentence Completion questions followed by 16 Reading Comprehension questions
  • 25 minutes: 5 Sentence Completion questions followed by 19 Reading Comprehension questions
  • 20 minutes: 6 Sentence Completion questions followed by 13 Reading Comprehension questions

The Math Section

The math sections measure a student’s ability to reason quantitatively, solve mathematical problems, and interpret data presented in graphical form. These sections focus on four areas of mathematics that are typically covered in the first three years of American high school education: Arithmetic, Algebra and Functions, Geometry, and Data Analysis. The Algebra section was recently expanded to include basic College Algebra. To test these skills, the SAT employs two different question types:

  • Multiple-Choice
  • Grid-Ins

The multiple-choice questions carry a .25-point penalty for incorrect answers. The grid-in questions carry no penalty for wrong answers, because the likelihood of guessing the correct answer is negligible.

The format of the three sections is:

  • 25 minutes: 20 Multiple-Choice questions
  • 25 minutes: 8 Multiple-Choice questions followed by 10 Grid-ins.
  • 20 minutes: 16 Multiple-Choice questions

The Writing Section

The writing section measures a student’s ability to recognize and conform to the conventions of standard written English. This section consists of one student-written essay and multiple-choice questions. The multiple-choice questions carry a .25-point penalty for incorrect answers. The writing section contains three types of multiple-choice questions:

  • Identifying Sentence Errors
  • Improving Sentences
  • Improving Paragraphs

The format of the two multiple-choice sections is:

  • 25 minutes: 11 Improving Sentence questions, 18 Identifying Sentence Error questions, and 6 Improving Paragraphs questions
  • 10 minutes: 14 Improving Sentence questions

The Experimental Section

The experimental section of the SAT is an additional 25-minute section. It can be a math, critical reading, or grammar section. It does not count towards the examinee’s score. The inclusion of this section within the SAT ensures a more fair and balanced scoring method, and allows the College Board to compile data on previously unreleased questions.

Other Information

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Exam Fee Test Validity Full Marks Minimum Requirement
US $ 65 5 Years 2400 1200*

Local Test Center in Nepal

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You can find local test center information by visiting this link https://collegereadiness.collegeboard.org/sat/register/find-test-centers 

Fee Structure

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Fee Structure & Duration:
Admission & Placement TestCourse Fee

Duration

Rs. 1000Rs. 12,500

6 weeks ( Monday to Friday)

Note: This course fee includes study materials and 4 mock tests.

FAQs

faq-bannerWhat does the SAT test?

The SAT tests the skills you’re learning in school: reading, writing and math. Your strength in these subjects is important for success in college and throughout your life.

  • The reading section includes reading passages and sentence completions.
  • The writing section includes a short essay and multiple-choice questions on identifying errors and improving grammar and usage.
  • The math section includes questions on arithmetic operations, algebra, geometry, statistics and probability.

How important is the SAT in college admission?

The SAT is just one factor among many that colleges use to get to know you better. It’s part of a comprehensive admission process that also takes into account your high school academics, extracurricular activities, recommendations, personal essay and other factors.

Every college and university uses a different combination of criteria for admission. Research the schools you’re interested in using www.nimaseducation.com to understand their unique admission policies.

How is the SAT scored?

Each section of your SAT (critical reading, mathematics and writing) will be scored on a 200- to 800-point scale, for a possible total of 2400. You’ll also get two “subscores” on the writing section: a multiple-choice score from 20 to 80, and an essay score from 2 to 12.

But how do you get these scores?

Two steps happen before you see a final score.

First, examiners figure out your raw score by:

  • Adding points for correct answers.
  • Subtracting a fraction of a point for wrong answers.

Remember: Questions that you skipped don’t count either for or against your score, and points aren’t taken away for wrong answers on the math questions where you needed to enter the answer into a grid.

Then examiners take your raw score and turn it into a scaled score. This is where the score of 200–800 points comes from, and it is done through a statistical process called “equating.” This process makes it possible to compare your score with the scores of other students who took alternative versions of the test, and to your own scores on previous tests.

How much time will I have to take the SAT?

The SAT is made up of 10 sections:

  • A 25-minute essay
  • Six 25-minute sections (mathematics, critical reading and writing)
  • Two 20-minute sections (mathematics, critical reading and writing)
  • A 10-minute multiple-choice writing section
  • Total test time: 3 hours and 45 minutes

You’ll also get three short breaks during the testing, so don’t forget to bring a snack!

How many times should I take the SAT?

Most students take the SAT once or twice. We don’t recommend taking it more than twice because there’s no evidence that taking the SAT multiple times significantly changes your score.

What is the “unscored” section?

Each SAT exam includes an extra 25-minute critical reading, mathematics or writing multiple-choice section that doesn’t count toward your score.

This section is where ETS tries out new questions to make sure that future exams are fair for students from different backgrounds. It also helps them make sure that scores from students taking future exams can be compared to scores from students who took earlier versions of the test.